The Manitou – Horror Book Review

The Manitou is definitely Graham Masterton’s bread-and-butter, the series being the best books he’s ever written. He went on to write many great novels, a total of 101 in all! Book review written by horror author, A.R. Braun.

In 1976’s The Manitou, based in San Francisco, something is growing on the back of an attractive woman named Karen Tandy’s neck—perceived as a tumor—which baffles her doctors.

Desperate for help, the good docs bring in a charlatan psychic named Harry Erskine—an unlikely hero who’s the perfect protagonist—as a paranormal investigator. Erskine helps the doctors discover that an ancient Native-American medicine man named Misquamacus, the most powerful Shaman ever, is back to seek revenge against the white man for stealing his country, as well as other atrocities. Reborn from a neck, the Native American is squat, has stunted limbs, but is none the less powerful.

Able to call up the most powerful demons in the world who can’t be exercised by Christianity because they were before Christ, the shaman’s chief demon is a squid spirit and, yes, I believe it’s Cthulhu.

This infernal medicine man is feared by all as the body count rises. Everything in the world has a Manitou, a Native-American spirit, and Harry and the good doctors call upon a modern-day Shaman named John Singing Rock for help, definitely less powerful than Misquamacus. They battle and wrack their brains to come up with the best modern Manitou to fight the insidious shaman.

Will they be able to stop the carnage so vehement it’ll be mass-murder? Or will they end up butchered, like the cops in the elevator?

This novel was ten times better than I expected it to be, and I highly recommend this gem, plus the sequels, which are all great. You’d better hope Native-American spirits don’t come looking for revenge!

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Review by Horror Writer, A.R. Braun. You can check out his latest Novel, “Dogman of Illinois, here.

A.R. Braun will also be featured on our anthology Mad Men, available for presale now.


Jimi Hendrix Loved to Read Sci-Fi Before He Had a Guitar

Happy Birthday, Sci-Fi Lover, Jimi Hendrix. Born #OTD in 1943, Jimi always lived in a bit of a fantasy world – as a kid, he carried around a broomstick he’d pretend to play for over a year, till he saved up enough for a guitar. Growing up in Seattle, Jimi had a hectic family life and often hopped between the homes of family, friends, and neighbors. He found escape in the make-believe – idolizing Flash Gordon of the eponymous ’30s #sciencefiction serial, and insisting on being called “Buster” after its dashing main #actor.
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Jimi Hendrix
 
If you are enjoying this article, we have more great Literary content on The Ritual Blog here.
After seeing a UFO hovering over his backyard one night, Jimi began writing his own stories, filling notebook after notebook with spaceships, aliens and epic galactic battles – visions that would later inform his spacy songs. Though he eventually outgrew the “Buster” nickname, his love for sci-fi never waned. After working as a paratrooper in the Army and a back-up guitarist for Little Richard, Jimi moved in with fellow sci-fi fan Chas Chandler, bassist of the Animals, who would lend him books from an extensive collection.
 
#Rockstar #Celebrity #Famous #JimiHendrix #Hendrix #Reading #Birthday #Amreading #Books #BookLover #SciFi #fiction #leer #leeresvivir #Bookstagram #Instagood #bookworm #bookish
 

Literary Birthday – Stevenson, Author of Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde

Author of “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, Robert Louis Stevenson was born #OTD in 1850. Stevenson was a Scottish novelist and travel writer, most noted for Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and A Child’s Garden of Verses.
Born and educated in Edinburgh, Stevenson suffered from serious bronchial trouble for much of his life, but continued to write prolifically and travel widely in defiance of his poor health. As a young man, he mixed in London literary circles, receiving encouragement from Andrew Lang, Edmund Gosse, Leslie Stephen and W. E. Henley, the last of whom may have provided the model for Long John Silver in Treasure Island. Stevenson spent several years in search of a location suited to his health, before finally settling in Samoa, where he died.

Early writing and travels

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Stevenson was visiting a cousin in England in late 1873 when he met two people who became very important to him: Sidney Colvin and Fanny (Frances Jane) Sitwell. Sitwell was a 34-year-old woman with a son, who was separated from her husband. She attracted the devotion of many who met her, including Colvin, who married her in 1901. Stevenson was also drawn to her, and they kept up a warm correspondence over several years in which he wavered between the role of a suitor and a son (he addressed her as “Madonna”). Colvin became Stevenson’s literary adviser and was the first editor of his letters after his death. He placed Stevenson’s first paid contribution in The Portfolio, an essay entitled “Roads”.[28]

Stevenson was soon active in London literary life, becoming acquainted with many of the writers of the time, including Andrew LangEdmund Gosse, and Leslie Stephen, the editor of the Cornhill Magazine who took an interest in Stevenson’s work. Stephen took Stevenson to visit a patient at the Edinburgh Infirmary named William Ernest Henley, an energetic and talkative man with a wooden leg. Henley became a close friend and occasional literary collaborator, until a quarrel broke up the friendship in 1888, and he is often considered to be the model for Long John Silver in Treasure Island.

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Stevenson was sent to Menton on the French Riviera in November 1873 to recuperate after his health failed. He returned in better health in April 1874 and settled down to his studies, but he returned to France several times after that.] He made long and frequent trips to the neighborhood of the Forest of Fontainebleau, staying at BarbizonGrez-sur-Loing, and Nemours and becoming a member of the artists’ colonies there. He also traveled to Paris to visit galleries and the theatres. He qualified for the Scottish bar in July 1875, and his father added a brass plate to the Heriot Row house reading “R.L. Stevenson, Advocate”. His law studies did influence his books, but he never practised law; all his energies were spent in travel and writing. One of his journeys was a canoe voyage in Belgium and France with Sir Walter Simpson, a friend from the Speculative Society, a frequent travel companion, and the author of The Art of Golf (1887). This trip was the basis of his first travel book An Inland Voyage (1878).

How Long it Took 40 Writers to Complete Their Works

 
 
Ever wonder how long it took some Writers to finish their masterpiece?
 
There are just individuals who were born to write. Ideas and words just flow out of their mind like a tap water. One might argue that it takes a lot of reading and practice as well to be a good writer. A great of number of famous authors write like a machine, going at an average of a few thousand words a day, and have written hundreds of books during their whole writing career, and sold millions of copies.
 
In this video, we’ll cover 40 famous writers, and how long they took to write one of their great works. We’ve gathered this information from an infographic created by PrinterInks and added another 10, a few that we think are too important to be left out. 

To read more about the art of fear appeals and Horror, check out my book, “On Writing Horror: the Art of Fear Appeals.”

Author of the wonderful book, “Call of the Wild”

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Author of the wonderful book Call of the Wild, Jack London, was born on this day, 1876, in #California. #JackLondon was an American #author best known for the adventure novels #WhiteFang and The Call of the Wild. Jack London grew up working-class. He carved out his own hardscrabble life as a teen. He rode trains, pirated oysters, shoveled coal, worked on a sealing ship on the Pacific and found employment in a cannery. In his free time he hunkered down at libraries, soaking up novels and travel books.