The Disclosure Event: Flash Fiction Frenzy

After the disclosure event, humans began advancing at a rapid state. But it wasn’t an advance in their technology. They were reaching new levels of consciousness and using a greater percentage of their brains.

The working theory is that the thought of the pending doom forced humans to focus more, like the way that things slow down during a car accident, where every detail is dramatically recalled in painstaking detail; down to the screeching of the tires, the shards of glass approaching expired passengers, the looks on their families faces as they tumble down the highways.

Essentially, the perpetual thought of disclosure forced humans to be in this constant state of awareness where they are able to take in and process more details, a lot more often. Drugs and life threatening experiences are no longer needed to “ascend,” so to speak.

It began with a rise in crop circle phenomena, along with malfunctioning electronics. Humans were being sent messages in private and as mass communications. At first these communications caused a divide between the smart people in group A, and the uneducated in group B. It didn’t matter what group you were in because soon, humans came to learn that there were messages being broadcast via crop circles.

The crop circles were translated to being a sort of count down. Not numerically, but through visual representations.

If you are enjoying The Disclosure Event, check out some of our other Flash Fiction at The Ritual blog thread here.

This alien art represented celestial events, comets, blood moons, eclipses, and their return. They were letting us know how close they were, using our own frame of reference. People panicked. These signs advanced our consciousness as a collective whole.

At the apex of our awareness, we began to find solace in what we thought were connections. Our ancestors began to communicate with us as guides for this new age. The weak people, however, went mad, and the evil people, used these means for maleficent ventures. Both of these minds, the weak and the corrupt were the the first ones to be taken.

Their ‘spiritual’ guides had tricked them. In fact, these guides had tricked us all and there was nothing we could do about it because they were already in our minds. The aliens were in control of our collective consciousness, it was all a ploy from day one. What we had connected with as being our ancestors, were in actuality, the alien race. They had raised our awareness only so that we could serve as portals for them to channel.

The world grew apart just as quickly as we learned to raise our awareness; it was ironic. 

Just as the Mayans, the Olmecs, the Atlantean people- we were also farmed out. Being “woke,” became a nightmare as we are harvested into slavery. With our consciousness still high, it makes our enslavement even that more painful. The cries, the clinking of shackles, the high pitch frequencies, inaudible clicks and slithers infiltrate our thoughts as we work on the fields for them. 

If you enjoyed The Disclosure Event, check out some of our other Flash Fiction at The Ritual blog thread here and consider signing up for our monthly newsletter below.

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More Hot Summer Reads!

More Hot Summer Reads on audible, as we have ramped up our audio listenting this Summer while we do yard work, jog, and lay poolside!

Last month we shared our recommendations on Audio book for Audio book month and we received some pretty positive feedback. That being said, this month we decided to share a few more of our reads/listens from Audible. The books below were all good and recommended by us. From dark fiction, to young adult fiction, and also some non-fiction made the list this month. Our two top picks would have to be “Remote Control,” and “City of Death.” Which will you listen to first?

Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton

Summer Reads include Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton
Summer Reads include Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton

The year is A.D. 922. A refined Arab courtier, representative of the powerful Caliph of Baghdad, encounters a party of Viking warriors who are journeying to the barbaric North. He is appalled by their Viking customs – the wanton sexuality of their pale, angular women, their disregard for cleanliness…their cold-blooded human sacrifices. But it is not until they reach the depths of the Northland that the courtier learns the horrifying and inescapable truth: he has been enlisted by these savage, inscrutable warriors to help combat a terror that plagues them – a monstrosity that emerges under cover of night to slaughter the Vikings and devour their flesh….

Eaters of the Dead was adapted to the screen as The 13th Warrior, starring Antonio Banderas.

If you are enjoying this article on Hot Summer Reads, we have bookstacks worth of Literature related content at the Ritual Blog.

City of Death by Ephraim Mattos: Hot Summer Reads

Summer Reads include City of Death by Ephraim Mattos
Summer Reads include City of Death by Ephraim Mattos

After leaving the US Navy SEAL teams in spring of 2017, Ephraim Mattos, age 24, flew to Iraq to join a small group of volunteer humanitarians known as the Free Burma Rangers, who were working on the front lines of the war on ISIS. Until being shot by ISIS on a suicidal rescue mission, Mattos witnessed unexplainable acts of courage and sacrifice by the Free Burma Rangers, who, while under heavy machine gun and mortar fire, assaulted across ISIS minefields, used themselves as human shields, and sprinted down ISIS-infested streets – all to retrieve wounded civilians.

In City of Death: Humanitarian Warriors in the Battle of Mosul, Mattos recounts in vivid detail what he saw and felt while he and the other Free Burma Rangers evacuated the wounded, conducted rescue missions, and at times fought shoulder-to-shoulder with the Iraqi Army against ISIS. Filled with raw and emotional descriptions of what it’s like to come face-to-face with death, this is the harrowing and uplifting true story of a small group of men who risked everything to save the lives of the Iraqi people and who followed the credence, “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends”. 

The Conception of Terror: Tales Inspired by M. R. James – Volume 1

An award-winning collection of four ghostly tales inspired by M. R. James.

Casting the Runes, adapted by Stephen Gallagher
—2019 New York Festivals Radio Award winner (Silver)

Summer Read include The Conception of Terror by M.R. James
Summer Read include The Conception of Terror by M.R. James

When academic Jo Harrington (Anna Maxwell Martin) is sent a paper—The Truth of Alchemy, by Anton Karswell—for peer review, she pulls no punches. Jo writes that the paper has no place in a serious academic publication and that Karswell is a half-bright fool. When the editor writes a rejection note to Karswell, he inadvertently includes Jo’s entire email. Occultist Karswell (Reece Shearsmith) doesn’t take kindly to criticism.

On the tube home with her partner Edward Dunning (Tom Burke), Jo spots a poster with her name on it. It reads: “In memory of Joanne Harrington, MLitt, PhD, died September eighteenth, three days were allowed.” Is there anything that Edward can do to save Jo from this curse?

Lost Hearts, adapted by A. K. Benedict

Teenager Stephanie Elliot (Rosa Coduri) is taken to Aswarby House to be fostered by Mrs. Bunch (Susan Jameson). Stephanie strikes up a friendship with Ben (Bill Milner), the adopted son of charismatic community leader Mr. Abney (Jeff Rawle). He tells her that Mr. Abney is a good man—he even took in a child refugee last year, but she stole from him and ran away. Stephanie is troubled by voices and visions of a dead girl clutching at her chest, and when Ben disappears she begins to suspect that all is not right in Aswarby House.

The Treasure of Abbot-Thomas, adapted by Jonathan Barnes

When former Somerton school pupil Greg Parsbury (Robert Bathurst) meets history teacher Mika Chantry (Pearl Mackie) at a memorial service for schoolmaster Sam Abbot-Thomas, he begs for her help. Greg has been sent a postcard by the estate of the mysterious and charismatic Abbot-Thomas. On it is a strange inscription in Latin, which he believes to be an inaugural clue in a treasure hunt much like the elaborate treasure hunts Abbot-Thomas used to set back in the 1970s. There were rumors that Abbot-Thomas possessed a hidden fortune, and Parsbury and Chantry set out to find it.

A View from a Hill, adapted by Mark Morris
—2019 New York Festivals Radio Award winner (Gold)

Comedian and podcaster Paul Fanshawe (Andy Nyman) and his wife, Sarah (Alice Lowe), visit the Cotswolds on holiday, trying to rebuild their lives after the death of their young son, Archie. While out walking, they spot a beautiful abbey across the valley on Gallows Hill, but when they reach it, they find the building is little more than rubble. While Sarah explores, Paul records commentary for his podcast. Sarah thinks she hears children’s laughter, but there’s no one there. Later that night, she listens to the recording and hears a child’s voice whisper, “Mummy.” Sarah is convinced that Archie is trying to reach them and wants to return to the ruins. But something far worse is waiting for them on Gallows Hill.

If you are enjoying this article on Hot Summer Reads, we have bookstacks worth of Literature related content at the Ritual Blog.

What The Hex by Alexis Daria

Summer Reads include What the Hex by Alexis Daria
Summer Reads include What the Hex by Alexis Daria

When Catalina Cartagena returns home for her older sister’s wedding, she’s shocked to discover that her soon-to-be brother-in-law is possessed by a demon. To make matters worse, everyone else seems to be under the demon’s spell—except for Diego Paz, younger brother of the groom and Cat’s childhood rival.

With only three days until the wedding, Cat must join forces with her sexy nemesis to break the spell and defeat the demon. If they fail, demonic forces will control two of the most powerful witch families on Isla Bruja.

There’s only one bed at the magical B&B, and it’s time for these witches to get wicked…in more ways than one.

The Republic of Pirates by Collin Woodard:Hot Summer Reads

Summer Reads include The Republic of Pirates by Collin Woodard
Summer Reads include The Republic of Pirates by Collin Woodard

In the early eighteenth century, the Pirate Republic was home to some of the great pirate captains, including Blackbeard, “Black Sam” Bellamy, and Charles Vane. Along with their fellow pirates—former sailors, indentured servants, and runaway slaves—this “Flying Gang” established a crude but distinctive democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which servants were free, blacks could be equal citizens, and leaders were chosen or deposed by a vote. They cut off trade routes, sacked slave ships, and severed Europe from its New World empires, and for a brief, glorious period the Republic was a success.


If you enjoyed this article, we have bookstacks worth of Literature related content at the Ritual Blog.

On Writing Horror Willy Martinez

  • On Writing Horror amassed from an obsession to learn where the power of fear resides. An anthology of works studying the way in which writers evoke fear and how they may affect us. On Writing Fear is an index of terror, drawing from Aristotle, Longinus, Edmund Burke, Che Guevarra, Wordsworth, Foucault, H.P. Lovecraft, Todorov, and many more.

    Chapters include digital illustrations created by the author.

    Also available at the Apple iBookstore, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and Smashwords.

    A must have collection of research on the power of Horror- a tormented treatment of the human passions!

    Table of Contents for On Writing Horror

    Ch 1. Fear and War: Crafting the War on Terror Using Fear Appeals Ch 2. The Art of the Coup D'etat Ch 3. The Feminine Supernatural versus the Male Supernatural Writers Ch 4. Projecting Ghost Children to Find Identity Ch 5. The Supernatural Power of the Sublime in Wordsworth's Poetry Ch 6. Disorienting Characters with Haunted Spaces and Auditory Hallucinations Ch 7. Modern Ghosts Ch 8. The Fantastic in Fear Ch 9. The Fun Side of Fear: Faustus' Tricky Imp of Satan Ch 10. Glorifying Satan

    Some of the art included:

    [caption id="attachment_4846" align="alignnone" width="188"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4847" align="alignnone" width="200"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4848" align="alignnone" width="194"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption]

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Acoustic Levitation Lecture

During one of our weekly Toastmaster meetings with the Marion VA Toastmasters Club, I delivered a lecture on Acoustic Levitation. It’s only about a seven minute lecture, check it out below. The links to the videos and research are also listed under the imbedded video.

Levitating droplets of water: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=669AcEBpdsY 

Another example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHAe4FFHtB0

Ultrasonic levitation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hE6KjLUkiw

Read the whole paper here: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms9661

A few years ago, sonic drilling technology was developed by NASA as a means to mine materials from rocks and other hard materials encountered on space missions. This helped boost interest in the capacity of sound to generate force, including the power necessary to levitate physical objects.

Compared to stories of heavy stones lifted high into the air by chanting and drum-playing monks, the achievements of 21 st century scientists may not seem impressive. But they do show that sound waves can be used to accomplish amazing things, and controlled experiments are more authoritative than unproven anecdotes from the distant past.  

Acoustic levitation is real, and as scientists learn more about how it works their ability to harness it will likely advance by leaps and bounds. 

Regardless of whether you believe acoustic levitation was used to construct the pyramids of Giza, stone hedge, or the coral castle near Miami Florida, one thing is for certain. Acoustic levitation is real, and Scientists across the world are studying this phenomenon; even NASA, as I mentioned earlier.

Once again, blurring the line between science and fiction.

If you liked this article, we have similar content talking about Science Fiction, here.

On Writing Horror Willy Martinez

  • On Writing Horror amassed from an obsession to learn where the power of fear resides. An anthology of works studying the way in which writers evoke fear and how they may affect us. On Writing Fear is an index of terror, drawing from Aristotle, Longinus, Edmund Burke, Che Guevarra, Wordsworth, Foucault, H.P. Lovecraft, Todorov, and many more.

    Chapters include digital illustrations created by the author.

    Also available at the Apple iBookstore, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and Smashwords.

    A must have collection of research on the power of Horror- a tormented treatment of the human passions!

    Table of Contents for On Writing Horror

    Ch 1. Fear and War: Crafting the War on Terror Using Fear Appeals Ch 2. The Art of the Coup D'etat Ch 3. The Feminine Supernatural versus the Male Supernatural Writers Ch 4. Projecting Ghost Children to Find Identity Ch 5. The Supernatural Power of the Sublime in Wordsworth's Poetry Ch 6. Disorienting Characters with Haunted Spaces and Auditory Hallucinations Ch 7. Modern Ghosts Ch 8. The Fantastic in Fear Ch 9. The Fun Side of Fear: Faustus' Tricky Imp of Satan Ch 10. Glorifying Satan

    Some of the art included:

    [caption id="attachment_4846" align="alignnone" width="188"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4847" align="alignnone" width="200"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4848" align="alignnone" width="194"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption]

Mad Men

  • Mad Men is a collection of three disturbing horror shorts from authors living in the Midwest. The themes explored in this collection range from man versus self, man versus man, and man versus creature. [caption id="attachment_4742" align="alignleft" width="188"]Mad Men eBook Mad Men eBook at Mind on Fire Books[/caption] Mad Men begins with Matt’s tale, a thought-provoking thriller which causes the reader to question his reality and what he fears within himself. The second tale explores the grotesque juxtaposed with beautiful nature, where the ending unfolds into a horrific dream, waking in even more terrible pain. The third tale is by seasoned horror writer, A.R. Braun – and his diabolical creatures never disappoint!  A.R. Braun’s goal is to be on the banned book list; we think this tale may just be evil enough to be considered. A must read before it does get banned! Mainstream Horror Shorts don’t always satisfy us in the way they should. They don’t open conversations about what it is that we fear or why we fear such things, they focus mainly on pop culture and gore. The writers in the Mad Men anthology understand the need for literate horror, opening discussions of man’s psyche. When these writers set out to tell a story, they are less interested in conveying fear and more interested in wonder, the sublime, and the infinite strangeness that drives all man and woman. Highly recommended for tweens, teens, and adults. The Mad Men anthology published by Mind on Fire Books. Written by Willy Martinez, A.R. Braun and Matt Lavitt. No part of this book shall be copied without permission from the publisher.

Ghost Children

  • The ghost children in “The Lost Ghost” and “The Wind in the Rose-Bush” are not restricted ghosts, and this is how these ghosts differ from the other ghosts of writers of Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman time such as Henry James, Sarah Jewett or Ambrose Bierce. These apparitions may seem cute, but think twice as these ghost children will leave you with goose bumps. This double feature of Mary E. Wilkins short fiction is creepy enough to leave you sleeping with the lights on.

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Writer or Prophet? Jules Verne Predicted Technology

Writer or prophet? Jules Verne, famous science fiction writer not only produced texts that we still talk about today in our classrooms, science groups, book clubs and cartoon such as Rick and Morty; he also predicted these seven technologies in his texts.

Not many people know this, but he is in fact, one of the original fathers of Science Fiction that affected a world wide audience. Jules Verne, was a French author writing the famous classics like Around the World in 80 Days, and 20K Leagues Under the Sea was born #OTD in 1828.

Beyond just the plot devices and aesthetic that still influences sci-fi stories to this day, Jules Verne made predictions about technology that are true.


He was also apparently a prophet. Here are 7 futuristic ideas or inventions that he depicted in his sci-fi fiction.


1. Electric Submarines: Jules Verne’s fantastical imagination produced inventions that were just as memorable as his protagonists. In the story Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Verne introduced the world to the submarine Nautilus.

Jules Vern Art for 20,000 leagues

2. Helicopter: Verne sketched out and imagined tons of aircraft during his time as an author. However, in the story Robur the Conqueror, he was extra specific with one of his descriptions. In the story, the character builds a machine out of pressboard that was controlled with high-speed rotors that propelled the aircraft to the heavens.

3. Jukebox and Hologram: The first time you may remember seeing the idea of the hologram in pop culture was probably in the classic film Star Wars. Yet, Jules was thinking about this way before Leia requested Obi-Wan’s help.

4. Newscasts: More of a futurist than a prophet, some describe Jules Verne as someone who was paying great attention to the times rather than simply outright prophesying. Verne was well acquainted with the technology of the time and played with ideas of how those technologies could evolve. In the Year 2889, Verne predicts an alternative to the newspaper.

5. Videoconferencing: In the same story, “In the Year 2889”, Jules Verne hinted at the idea that is very close to what you may describe as video conferencing today. Calling it the phonotelephote, the device allowed people to communicate with each other over great distances.
Jules Vern, “Journey to Mars” Graphic Art.

6. Solar sails: If you were to read Jules Verne’s From the Earth to the Moon, you would think he is describing space travel today.

7. Lunar module space travel: In From the Earth to the Moon, Jules Verne was able to capture humanity’s fascination with the moon and eventually Space travel. Verne also mentioned splashdown spaceships, a space base in Florida, light pressure propulsion, and space suits all way before their time.


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On Writing Horror Willy Martinez

  • On Writing Horror amassed from an obsession to learn where the power of fear resides. An anthology of works studying the way in which writers evoke fear and how they may affect us. On Writing Fear is an index of terror, drawing from Aristotle, Longinus, Edmund Burke, Che Guevarra, Wordsworth, Foucault, H.P. Lovecraft, Todorov, and many more.

    Chapters include digital illustrations created by the author.

    Also available at the Apple iBookstore, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and Smashwords.

    A must have collection of research on the power of Horror- a tormented treatment of the human passions!

    Table of Contents for On Writing Horror

    Ch 1. Fear and War: Crafting the War on Terror Using Fear Appeals Ch 2. The Art of the Coup D'etat Ch 3. The Feminine Supernatural versus the Male Supernatural Writers Ch 4. Projecting Ghost Children to Find Identity Ch 5. The Supernatural Power of the Sublime in Wordsworth's Poetry Ch 6. Disorienting Characters with Haunted Spaces and Auditory Hallucinations Ch 7. Modern Ghosts Ch 8. The Fantastic in Fear Ch 9. The Fun Side of Fear: Faustus' Tricky Imp of Satan Ch 10. Glorifying Satan

    Some of the art included:

    [caption id="attachment_4846" align="alignnone" width="188"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4847" align="alignnone" width="200"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4848" align="alignnone" width="194"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption]

Mad Men

  • Mad Men is a collection of three disturbing horror shorts from authors living in the Midwest. The themes explored in this collection range from man versus self, man versus man, and man versus creature. [caption id="attachment_4742" align="alignleft" width="188"]Mad Men eBook Mad Men eBook at Mind on Fire Books[/caption] Mad Men begins with Matt’s tale, a thought-provoking thriller which causes the reader to question his reality and what he fears within himself. The second tale explores the grotesque juxtaposed with beautiful nature, where the ending unfolds into a horrific dream, waking in even more terrible pain. The third tale is by seasoned horror writer, A.R. Braun – and his diabolical creatures never disappoint!  A.R. Braun’s goal is to be on the banned book list; we think this tale may just be evil enough to be considered. A must read before it does get banned! Mainstream Horror Shorts don’t always satisfy us in the way they should. They don’t open conversations about what it is that we fear or why we fear such things, they focus mainly on pop culture and gore. The writers in the Mad Men anthology understand the need for literate horror, opening discussions of man’s psyche. When these writers set out to tell a story, they are less interested in conveying fear and more interested in wonder, the sublime, and the infinite strangeness that drives all man and woman. Highly recommended for tweens, teens, and adults. The Mad Men anthology published by Mind on Fire Books. Written by Willy Martinez, A.R. Braun and Matt Lavitt. No part of this book shall be copied without permission from the publisher.

7 Mind-Provoking Quotes from H.G. Wells

As one of the founding fathers of science fiction, H.G. Wells certainly had a lot to say about the human race. From mankind’s fondness for war to our place in the universe, Wells certainly didn’t shy away from sharing his opinions. In honor of what would have been his 154th birthday, here are a few of H.G. Wells’s greatest hits.

7 Mind-Provoking Quotes from H.G. Wells

1. ON WAR

“If we don’t end war, war will end us.”

—From Things to Come (1936)

John F. Kennedy’s speechwriters later adapted the phrase for his 1961 address to the United Nations: “The weapons of war must be abolished before they abolish us.”

2. ON GLOBALIZATION

“Our true nationality is mankind.”

—From The Outline of History (1920)

3. ON WRITING

“I write as straight as I can, just as I walk as straight as I can, because that is the best way to get there.”

—From Experiment in Autobiography (1934)

4. ON GOLF

“The uglier a man’s legs are, the better he plays at golf. It’s almost a law.”

—From Bealby: A Holiday (1915)

5. ON THE FUTURE

“We were making the future, and hardly any of us troubled to think what future we were making.”

—From When The Sleeper Wakes (1899)

7 Mind-Provoking Quotes from H.G. Wells

6. ON EDUCATION

“Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.”

—From The Outline of History (1920)

7. ON REALITY

“The past is but the beginning of a beginning, and all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn.”

—From The Discovery of the Future (1902)

H.G. Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, and even including two books on recreational war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a “father of science fiction”, along with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback.During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of aircraft, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web. His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering. 

For a list of his top 30 works, click here.

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On Writing Horror Willy Martinez

  • On Writing Horror amassed from an obsession to learn where the power of fear resides. An anthology of works studying the way in which writers evoke fear and how they may affect us. On Writing Fear is an index of terror, drawing from Aristotle, Longinus, Edmund Burke, Che Guevarra, Wordsworth, Foucault, H.P. Lovecraft, Todorov, and many more.

    Chapters include digital illustrations created by the author.

    Also available at the Apple iBookstore, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and Smashwords.

    A must have collection of research on the power of Horror- a tormented treatment of the human passions!

    Table of Contents for On Writing Horror

    Ch 1. Fear and War: Crafting the War on Terror Using Fear Appeals Ch 2. The Art of the Coup D'etat Ch 3. The Feminine Supernatural versus the Male Supernatural Writers Ch 4. Projecting Ghost Children to Find Identity Ch 5. The Supernatural Power of the Sublime in Wordsworth's Poetry Ch 6. Disorienting Characters with Haunted Spaces and Auditory Hallucinations Ch 7. Modern Ghosts Ch 8. The Fantastic in Fear Ch 9. The Fun Side of Fear: Faustus' Tricky Imp of Satan Ch 10. Glorifying Satan

    Some of the art included:

    [caption id="attachment_4846" align="alignnone" width="188"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4847" align="alignnone" width="200"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4848" align="alignnone" width="194"]Art for On Writing Horror Art for On Writing Horror[/caption]

Mad Men

  • Mad Men is a collection of three disturbing horror shorts from authors living in the Midwest. The themes explored in this collection range from man versus self, man versus man, and man versus creature. [caption id="attachment_4742" align="alignleft" width="188"]Mad Men eBook Mad Men eBook at Mind on Fire Books[/caption] Mad Men begins with Matt’s tale, a thought-provoking thriller which causes the reader to question his reality and what he fears within himself. The second tale explores the grotesque juxtaposed with beautiful nature, where the ending unfolds into a horrific dream, waking in even more terrible pain. The third tale is by seasoned horror writer, A.R. Braun – and his diabolical creatures never disappoint!  A.R. Braun’s goal is to be on the banned book list; we think this tale may just be evil enough to be considered. A must read before it does get banned! Mainstream Horror Shorts don’t always satisfy us in the way they should. They don’t open conversations about what it is that we fear or why we fear such things, they focus mainly on pop culture and gore. The writers in the Mad Men anthology understand the need for literate horror, opening discussions of man’s psyche. When these writers set out to tell a story, they are less interested in conveying fear and more interested in wonder, the sublime, and the infinite strangeness that drives all man and woman. Highly recommended for tweens, teens, and adults. The Mad Men anthology published by Mind on Fire Books. Written by Willy Martinez, A.R. Braun and Matt Lavitt. No part of this book shall be copied without permission from the publisher.

Jonathan Swift and His Modest Proposal on Eating Poor Kids

Save the world, eat children. A “Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift would not be so modest it it were no for the obscene language to make the idea seem less abominable – that is to say – because of the use of obscene language, the tone of the dilemma does seem modest or even a bit comical at times. These reaction or sympathies are created with Jonathan Swift’s use of diction and syntax; he takes two unwanted objects (children and poor people) and confers vulgar language upon them to convince us to side with the lesser of the two ‘evils.’ It is this obscene literature that diverts the attention away from the actual ideas in the proposal and converts the idea of devouring poor children into an economical and viable opportunity.

Swift first proposes the problem with complete anti-veneration towards the poor: “the children of poor people [are] a burden to their parents or county.”
Red meat. Mind on Fire Books Blog

His usage of negative language invites us to have the same disdain for these ‘poor children’, or burdens, as he calls them. First he finds a common ground to unite the people and then he charges poor children as the enemy. He has chosen a common enemy and is now attacking them with negative ideas.

But attacking children and making them seem useless is kind of hard to do; people have morals and won’t stand for the abuse of children. Swift realizes this and then deploys scatology in order to distract us as readers. From this point on, Swift treats these children as commodities or trade-able objects and realizes that it would be vein to just kill children, so he then justifies this case by stating that grown people need to eat as well. He appeals to our survival instincts, eliciting the “better you than me” mentality which is natural to humans.

If you enjoyed these quotes, check out the rest of our content on The Ritual Blog here.

Swift takes the conscious and taboo topic of poverty and presents the arguments that wealthy or working people can agree with. He does this by proposing to turn these children into a ‘livestock’ which is a business and process that all people are familiar with. This serves as a euphemism to disguise the idea of harvesting children and makes the explicit implicit in seasonal foods. Stating that “a good fat child” can serve up to four people with “nutritive meat” is an example of a logical appeal made to us readers.

“A good fat thick” sounds disgusting at first but when contrasted with nutritive meat for you and your family, the argument seems a bit more plausible. Clearly, Swift’s use of vulgar comparisons serves as a platter for serving improper grossness as a permissible delicacy.

Swift counters the negative with a kind of humility when he states, “I do therefore humbly offer it to public consideration…” So Swift is proposing a very immoral idea yet it doesn’t seem so bad, after all, this is a humble offer isn’t it? With words such as humble or modest to counteract the negative charges, the ideas once again don’t seem as horrific. This is why swift repeats himself multiple times by presenting this proposal as humble or modest.

Another counter action in this proposal would be Swift’s references to everyday people (his American friend), French physicians, and famous formosans, George Psalmanazar. With these cases, Swift has us asking of ourselves: if this is common knowledge to the rest of the world and well known to renowned scientists, then why not hear out this modest proposal? He places ideas into perspective; from the common man to the Irish man.

If you enjoyed these quotes, check out the rest of our content on The Ritual Blog here.

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To defend his argument, Swift invites others to oppose his scatology and still be able “to find food and raimnet for an hundred thousand useless mouths and backs.” Once again, he is using reverse psychology to challenge an individual to defend those “useless mouths and backs.” If anybody does challenge Swift, then they are subject to supporting poverty, useless bodies and contributing to the laziness of those who “wish to deliver the Kingdom to the Pretender.”

When this proposal is not acting humble, it is firing off into the direction of comical dissolution to the victimization of children, or as Swift would put it, the salvation of a country and a people. When studied closely, one can see that it is the art of scatology that makes this proposal plausible, implicit and modest.

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I Told You So – George Orwell and 11 Quotes About War and Power

George Orwell hated his fellow intellectuals, whom he accused of a range of sins: a lack of patriotism, resentment of money and physical vigor, concealed sexual frustration, pretension, and dishonesty. He loved “the ordinary person” and the lives led by those “not especially blessed by material goods, people who work in ordinary jobs, who don’t have much of an education, who won’t achieve greatness, and who nevertheless love, care for others, work, have fun, raise children, and have large thoughts about the deepest questions in ways Orwell thought especially admirable.

His novels, “1984” and “Animal Farm” were written out of disdain for his fellow intellectuals, reflecting his shortcomings in life. Here are 10 quotes that are still relevant today, more than a half a century after his works were published.

George Orwell on Mind on Fire Books

“Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.”

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

“Pacifism is objectively pro-fascist. This is elementary common sense. If you hamper the war effort of one side, you automatically help out that of the other. Nor is there any real way of remaining outside such a war as the present one. In practice, ‘he that is not with me is against me.”

Thank you for reading, you can find more about the distribution of power and war by reading Racism as a Governing Apparatus or Fidel Castro VS Shakespeare.

“Speaking the Truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act.”

“All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.”

George Orwell quotes for Mind on Fire Books

“Political language. . . is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind.”

“Liberal: a power worshiper without power.”

“We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.”

“Power is not a means, it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power.”

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George Orwell quotes for Mind on Fire Books

“War is a way of shattering to pieces, or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea, materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable, and hence, in the long run, too intelligent.”

“The war is not meant to be won, it is meant to be continuous. Hierarchical society is only possible on the basis of poverty and ignorance. This new version is the past and no different past can ever have existed. In principle the war effort is always planned to keep society on the brink of starvation. The war is waged by the ruling group against its own subjects and its object is not the victory over either Eurasia or East Asia, but to keep the very structure of society intact.”

Thank you for reading, you can find more about the distribution of power and war by reading Racism as a Governing Apparatus or Fidel Castro VS Shakespeare.

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The Pandemic is a Bone Chilling Dystopia According to The Jetsons

I grew up watching The Jetsons during a time when Hanna-Barbera classic cartoons were still aired on TV. I can’t recall what networks they played on but I remember watching The Flintstones, Scooby-Doo, Where are You! (and all of its spin-offs), Wacky Races, The Yogi Bear Show, The Smurfs, Shirt Tales, Pound Puppies, and countless others.

But there’s one show that sticks out more than any other at this moment, as my robotic vacuum zooms in the background as I type. When people make jokes demanding to know why, in the year 2020, they still haven’t gotten their flying cars and jetpacks, they’re probably referencing The Jetsons. Since its debut in 1962, the Hanna-Barbera cartoon has become synonymous with the gleaming utopia promised by technology.

But this pandemic has us realizing what the creators of the Jetsons knew over 50 years ago. Today, we are expected to work from home, take online classes; we are even being pushed by our health care providers to schedule a video conference rather than doing it in person. Have the Jetsons actually predicted a bone-chilling dystopia?

Now all we need are those flying cars, talking dogs, and complete robot maids to help with the house chores. In a world full of Kardashians, be a Judy Jetson!

If you are enjoying this article, we have more great literary content on The Ritual Blog here.

The Jetsons
The Jetsons

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