Spanish Playwright Produces Over 1,400 Works of Drama

Think you can write over 1,400 works of #drama in your lifetime? This guy Lope De Vega managed to during the 1,500’s. Born #OTD in 1562 he was an outstanding dramatist of the Spanish Golden Age, author of as many as 1,800 plays and several hundred shorter dramatic pieces, of which 431 plays and 50 shorter pieces are extant.
Vega became identified as a playwright with the comedia, a comprehensive term for the new drama of Spain’s Golden Age. Vega’s productivity for the stage, however exaggerated by report, remains phenomenal. He claimed to have written an average of 20 sheets a day throughout his life and left untouched scarcely a vein of writing then current. Cervantes called him “the prodigy of nature.”

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How Long it Took 40 Writers to Complete Their Works

 
 
Ever wonder how long it took some Writers to finish their masterpiece?
 
There are just individuals who were born to write. Ideas and words just flow out of their mind like a tap water. One might argue that it takes a lot of reading and practice as well to be a good writer. A great of number of famous authors write like a machine, going at an average of a few thousand words a day, and have written hundreds of books during their whole writing career, and sold millions of copies.
 
In this video, we’ll cover 40 famous writers, and how long they took to write one of their great works. We’ve gathered this information from an infographic created by PrinterInks and added another 10, a few that we think are too important to be left out. 

To read more about the art of fear appeals and Horror, check out my book, “On Writing Horror: the Art of Fear Appeals.”

A Gothic Poem by Robert Maturin

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The limner’s art may trace the absent feature,
And give the eye of distant weeping faith
To view the form of its idolatry;
But oh! the scenes ‘mid which they met and parted;
The thoughts–the recollections sweet and bitter,–
Th’ Elysian dreams of lovers, when they loved,–
Who shall restore them?

By Robert Maturin